Moments

Over the weekend I was running errands with Luke in tow. Having skipped his nap in lieu of playing and squealing and being a toddler, he was resting his heavy head on my chest as we stood in line at the check out. His bustling little body and busy hands, now resting on my shoulder with a gentle grip on my shirt collar.

I had just been making arrangements for his next surgery prior to our stop at the store and was lost in thought running through mental notes of what still needed to be secured for his procedure. I was swaying back and forth, Luke slowing drifting in and out of sleep. I kissed his head, gave him a snuggling squeeze, and breathed him in. The woman in line behind me kindly leaned forward and very sweetly told me to make sure I enjoy these moments – that one day they will be gone too quickly.

I nodded my head and gave her a smile, thanked her, and proceeded to check out, all the while thinking to myself – “she doesn’t know”.

She doesn’t know how my heart yearned for him before he was ever conceived. She doesn’t know the absolute and sheer elation of confirming a pregnancy I thought would never happen. The 6 pregnancy tests I took on Mother’s Day morning (not to mention all the ones in days prior) and the tackling leap I made into my husband’s arms afterward. Or, that before I even took those 6 tests, I had an instinct that told me I was pregnant and saved me from taking a medication an ER doctor prescribed because he said I “likely lost the baby and probably have irritable bowel”.

She doesn’t know that when I heard his heartbeat for the very first time, it was the most beautiful and breathtaking sound I would ever know. That it was strong and quick, and such a gift. And that 13 weeks later that same heartbeat, as strong as it was, would lead us to discovering he had a critical congenital heart defect.

She doesn’t know the shock I felt, and that in an instant, all my joy was replaced with stagnating fear.

She doesn’t know the journal I started for him that Mother’s Day, telling him how much he was wanted and already loved. Or the letters I would write to him from my heart, sharing happenings of our day, and then telling him of his diagnosis, and how much it hurt.

She doesn’t know that I ceased all planning on his nursery. That I closed the door to the room where he would one day sleep, and for a little while, closed the door to my heart. That I didn’t want a baby shower, clothing, toys or empty albums, because it hurt too much – the thought he might never use them and I might never get to fill them.

She doesn’t know the sadness that overcame me or how hard I fought to push it out – and won.

She doesn’t know that on the day I pulled out all the stops and made a decision to love in spite of all the “what-ifs”, the door to his room reopened and with it, a tide of love so strong, it would wipe out anything and anyone in its path. That that very room would become the only place I would find solace and safety, and feel close to him when I came home, and he didn’t.

She doesn’t know how weeks of ultrasounds and tests leading up to his birth brought me closer to him. How seeing his magnificent and delicate body flicker across a screen, learning every facet of his heart, would further solidify my commitment to him.

She doesn’t know how with every passing day, carrying his beautiful body in my womb, knowing full well challenges would lie ahead, that I vowed to love him through it all. For hours I would sit, talking to just him, loving him. I would lie awake in the night – his most active time – just to feel him move because I feared I might never have the chance once he was born.

She doesn’t know how hard and often I prayed, begging God to just let me keep him. And that no matter what, I would love him in life and I would love him in death, if God called him home.

She doesn’t know how I labored with him – becoming so ill, both our lives in jeopardy. The moments when his heart rate began to plummet and my body was giving out. Facing a heart-wrenching reality and making it known that at all costs, Luke must be saved.

She doesn’t know once he was born, I never heard his first cry or that I don’t fully remember him being laid beside me an hour later, his precious face I would not see through all the tape and tubing. Three days I would wait to see him again and the reunion, so much like coming home. The other half of my heart lying in a NICU, so frail, so tiny – so mine.

She doesn’t know the hours upon hours I spent at his bedside. So many sleepless nights of worry and because I just wouldn’t leave him. Setting alarms reminding me to pump because it was the only thing I could do for my baby, and all the while, machine suctioning, I would sob. I sobbed because this wasn’t how it was supposed to be. I sobbed because I wanted my baby to my breast, not a sterile, cold machine. I sobbed because I had seen another mother lose her precious boy just moments before, and I too, now understood the delicate balance of life. And I sobbed.

She doesn’t know the fears and tears I have shed – joy and sadness. Handing my baby to a surgeon, not knowing if he would ever come back to me and when he did, the rejoicing in my heart at his new life.

She doesn’t know how my heart was being prepared for a baby I thought I might lose – a baby that I needed more than he ever needed, or will need me.

If she knew these things…how I still rock him before bed every night, sometimes to his dismay. Or that I check on him before I drift to sleep and then again like clockwork, awake in the middle of the night, to watch him breathe. That I see him – really see him – play and interact, and I admire him, adore him, for all he has achieved.

If she knew we still have a pebbly and uncertain road ahead, or all the many ways he’s making strides. That a milestone is so much more than that – it is extraordinary – and how my heart swells and leaps when he learns something new and is so proud of himself.

And when he’s racing around all full of boy – screaming and yelling and dirty, causing fantastic destruction in his path, and so trustingly throws himself into my arms, I feel his heart thumping and pumping, red cheeks and sweaty brow — I know. I know full well, these are the moments. Such precious moments. If she knew all my heart holds – life-altering experience that cannot be unseen or unfelt – she would know, it is in these moments that I fully live every minute of every day.

Life lived isn’t always to be measured in years. It is in the depth. Live fully. Love deeply. No regrets. Mind the moments.

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One thought on “Moments

  1. THANKYOU for writing and please do not stop. I feel like I am reading my own emotions and our own journey- like you our son had chd and was born prematurely with hellp syndrome and we also watched a little heart angel who was born on the same day as our son, operated on the same day by the same surgeon lose his battle and I have never been the same again from that day. We have since seen acquired brain injury and a while host of other complications and the way you describe the places you have to look for strength within you is so spot on. When there is no other option you can easily continue to love and fight and love even harder. Your blog will help many and I hope it helps you just as much along your journey. Thankyou

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